Department of Psychology

Resources / Course Descriptions

Descriptions of courses offered by the Department of Psychology are listed below. While every effort has been made to keep this list as current and up-to-date as possible, please consult your student handbook for the most current descriptions.


NOTE: Course credits given in the following format "0-0-0" translate to:
class hours - lab hours - total credits

Psychology (PSYC)

  • PSYC 1101 - Introduction to General Psychology

    • This course is an introduction to the theoretical and scientific study of behavior that emphasizes historical and current theories, methods, and research findings related to the influences of biological, cognitive, and social factors on behavior.
    • Prerequisites: none
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 2000 - The Science of Psychology

    • This course provides a survey of the skills needed to read, understand, and evaluate various claims related to the prediction and shaping of behavior. Topics include key components of scientific methodology; systematic comparison, contrast, and evaluation of sources of information about psychology; the roles of the American Psychological Association and Association for Psychological Science in research; techniques for exploring psychological topics; and application of research findings. Emphasis is placed on becoming critical consumers of research. Required for the minor in psychology.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 2210 - Careers in Psychology

    • This course focuses on career planning and development issues for psychology majors. Using a combination of lecture, readings, and exercises, students will be exposed to information designed to assist in the clarification, selection, and pursuit of a career in psychology or a related field. Topics will include an overview of the undergraduate major in psychology, career options in psychology and related fields, preparation for employment with a bachelor's degree, preparing for and succeeding in graduate school, and applying for a job or to a graduate school.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101; declared psychology major.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 2258 - Psychology of Adjustment

    • The dynamics of normal and maladaptive adjustment, including the study of appropriate and inappropriate reactions to frustration and stress; resolution of conflicts, fears and anxiety; building emotional stability and preventing mental illness.
    • Prerequisites: ENGL 0099 and READ 0099, if required.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 2300 - Research Methods and Statistics

    • In this course, students are introduced to methods and statistics used in psychological research. Emphasis is placed on non-experimental methodologies such as observation, correlational research, surveys, archival research, and quasi-experimental and ex post facto designs. Topics include an introduction to the scientific method, an overview of experimental design, measurement and error, experimental control, descriptive statistics, statistical inference, scientific writing, and ethical issues in research. Laboratory work is designed to enable students to apply course topics.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2210 (may be taken concurrently); ENGL 1101; and MATH 1101, 1111, 1112, or 1113
    • Credits: 3-2-4
  • PSYC 3010 - Educational Psychology

    • This course is designed to examine the application of psychological concepts, principles, theories, and methodologies related to issues of teaching and learning in the school setting. This course also examines how individuals develop and learn, with particular emphasis upon the classroom environment, including motivation, student interests, creating a healthy learning climate, language development, testing, and individual differences.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3040 - Motivation and Emotion

    • This course examines motivation and emotion that underlie thought and behavior from a variety of perspectives. The course explores biological/physiological, cognitive, developmental, evolutionary, and social approaches to motivation and emotion. In addition, we examine the historical background of motivation and emotion research, as well as a number of current applied motivational approaches.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3205 - Child Development

    • In this course students examine the developmental time period from conception through early adolescence with a major focus on ages 36 months to 15 years. The course covers the biological, emotional, social, language, and motor changes children experience as they develop. Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class emphasizes individual differences, the influence and importance of the environment and relationships for healthy development, and the sociocultural context of development.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3270 - Engineering Psychology

    • This course provides a survey of the applied areas of psychology, which has proven useful in the design of equipment for human use and in the design of man-machine systems. This course is offered at a beginning level and is conducted as a lecture course. The content is basically psychological, but the emphasis is on how psychological knowledge can be applied in the design or organization of machines, equipment or systems intended for human use.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3273 - Forensic Psychology

    • This course provides the student with an overview of the theories that support the utilization of psychology in the legal system and how those theories and psychological research are applied in law enforcement, the courts, and in corrections. Although the focus in the course is primarily on the United States, some attention is devoted to an international view of forensic psychology.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3301 - Experimental Design and Analysis

    • In this course, students examine experimental designs used in psychological research. Topics include the selection of appropriate experimental designs for different research questions, hypothesis testing, independent-groups and within-subjects designs, complex designs, data collection strategies, statistical analysis using t-tests and analysis of variance, the interpretation of results, and the writing of research reports. Laboratory work is designed to enable students to apply course topics.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2210 and PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 3-2-4
  • PSYC 3305 - Life-Span Developmental Psychology

    • Human development from conception to death, emphasizing biological, cognitive, emotional, social and personality development. Scientific approaches for studying developmental psychology will stress the importance of research methodology and research findings across the life-span. Theories of development and applications to real-world problems will provide a context for understanding how humans change during the life-cycle.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3310 - Psychopharmacology

    • This course addresses how psychoactive drugs work in the central nervous system to affect behavior. Stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, analgesics and psychotropic drugs will be discussed primarily in terms of their pharmacological action in the brain. Substance abuse and treatment disorders will be addressed from a biological perspective.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course.
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3315 - Psychology of Infant Development

    • This course examines the developmental time period from conception up to 36 months. The course will cover the biological, emotional, social, language, and motor changes infants progress through during the first three years of life. Using contemporary theory, research, and methods relevant to developmental psychology, the class will emphasize the uniqueness of each infant and toddler, the influence and importance of environment and relationships for healthy development, and the sociocultural context of development.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3320 - Leadership and Group Dynamics

    • Theory and application of psychological knowledge regarding group formation, group process, and leadership. Issues are examined in the context of ongoing intensive group discussion. Experiential activities will be included in the course to provide students with opportunities to apply and observe the group process.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3325 - Social Psychology

    • This course examines how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are shaped by the social environment. Topics include interpersonal attraction, affiliation, aggression, prejudice, conformity, attitudes, persuasion, social cognition, altruism, self-presentation, social perception, and group behavior. Experimental research findings are emphasized.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3335 - Theories of Personality

    • This course surveys classic and current theories of personality that represent several of the major perspectives in psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, biological, developmental, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, sociocultural), highlighting the contributions of each theory to personality description, assessment, research, therapy, and application.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3340 - The Psychology of Family Interaction: A Developmental Perspective

    • An in-depth coverage of the psychological dynamics involved in parent/child relationships. A developmental approach will be employed to explore the changing needs and demands of the child and the parents as each progress in their own development. Current research and theory concerning parenting techniques, the psychological atmosphere of the home and the interaction of the child's temperament with the parents will be discussed. Contemporary family issues such as daycare, domestic violence, single parenting and children with special needs will be presented.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3355 - Cross-Cultural Psychology

    • An overview of the study and application of psychological principles from a global cultural perspective, including Asian, African, European and North and South American cultures. Topics such as cognition, attitude structure and change, interpersonal communication, personality and mental health will be discussed in the contexts of different cultural orientations in the world, and both between and within-group differences and similarities will be discussed.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3365 - Human Sexuality

    • An examination of the biological, personal, interpersonal and social aspects of human sexual behavior. Topics include: sexual values, sex and gender, sex and love, sexual behavior over the life span, reproduction, sex and health, sexual dysfunction and treatment, and social problems/issues related to sexual behavior.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3370 - Industrial-Organizational Psychology

    • The application of research and psychological principles to human behavior in the workplace. Course topics will include the psychological aspects of employment selection and assessment, performance appraisal, employee and work team development, reorganization and downsizing, work stress, employee violence, work/family conflict, and the changing nature of the workplace.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3375 - Psychology of Career Development

    • The application of research and psychological principles with respect to how people formulate and make career decisions. The course explores career development across the life-span, focusing on theories of career decision making, work adjustment, adult career crises and transitions, and career counseling interview and assessment techniques.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3380 - Principles of Psychological Testing

    • Designed to introduce the principles that underlie the development, use and interpretation of psychological assessment tools. Topics include: test construction, survey development, scaling, norming, assessment interpretation issues and psychological assessment applications in industrial, vocational, clinical and research settings. Additionally, psychological assessment will be discussed in terms of social, legal and ethical concerns.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3385 - Ethnic Minority Psychology

    • This course will provide an overview of the study and application of ethnic minority psychology. We will examine concepts and issues that pertain to ethnic minority groups in the United States, particularly the following four groups: African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Native Americans. Topics for discussions are: multicultural theory and research, history, cultural values, identity, developmental and family issues, mental health and other relevant issues that are pertinent to the experiences of the above-mentioned four ethnic minority groups in the United States. The course will be conducted with a combination of lectures, class discussion, guest speakers, group activities, student presentations, videos, etc.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3395 - Psychology of Prejudice and Privilege

    • This course focuses on psychological theory and research as mechanisms of understanding prejudice and discrimination. Close attention is paid to how privilege (e.g., racial, gender, sexuality, and/or class privilege) can influence how we perceive ourselves and others within and outside our social/cultural group(s). Coursework may involve readings from both psychology and literature, viewing of relevant films, and participation in experiential learning exercises and dialogues.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3398 - Internship in Psychology

    • The Internship in Psychology course is a structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is chosen in relation to the student’s major and interests. Practical experience is combined with a research approach that investigates issues relevant to the internship. Students meet with the internship coordinator to develop an appropriate plan that will lead to the writing of a research-oriented paper or research project, a required part of the internship.
    • Prerequisites: Prerequisite: PSYC 3301, declared major in psychology, permission of the instructor, and two additional 3000-level psychology courses
    • Credits: 1-6 Credit Hours
  • PSYC 3401 - Psychology of Diversity

    • In this course, students review current theories and research on the psychology of diversity. Students explore psychological principles and research as they relate to human behavior and examine how people perceive and interact with others who have different backgrounds, values, cultures, experiences and ideas. The class emphasizes the dynamics of diversity in society.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3410 - Health Psychology

    • Through the use of theoretical and empirical approaches, this course focuses on a biopsychological approach to health psychology including psychological and physiological aspects of U.S. and global health issues. Students will develop knowledge of the psychological aspects of a variety of health topics. Potential topics include body management systems, disease prevention, chronic illnesses, pain, stress and coping, substance abuse, nutrition, and alternative models of health behavior change.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3425 - Psychology of Gender

    • This course examines gender issues from a psychological perspective. Topics include the social construction of gender, gender and personality development, sex role socialization, and a critical examination of the research on gender differences. The ways in which gender intersects with other aspects of identity (e.g., race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation) are examined. Scientific research findings are emphasized.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or GWST 3000
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3505 - The Psychology of the Emerging Adult: Late Adolescence through Early Adulthood

    • This course focuses on development from late adolescence through early adulthood and the unique physiological, cognitive, and psychosocial issues occurring during this transitional period that are not well explained by traditional conceptualizations of standard development periods. Familiarity with the major physical transitions associated with pubescence, the cognitive changes necessary for the abstract reasoning associated with this time period, and the increased complexities inherent in the social experience typical of this age group.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3510 - Psychoneuroimmunology: Mind Body Pathways

    • This course takes a novel approach to the interdisciplinary field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) by exploring research and providing practical applications that illustrate how stress over time may impact psychological and physical well-being. Students will be exposed to current PNI literature, experientially explore effects of stress and coping strategies, and participate in a PNI laboratory assignment. Topics will include, but are not limited to: Mind-Body Pathways; Stress and Illness; Metabolism, Growth, and Stress; Sleep and Stress; Coping and Stress Management.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course or permission of the instructor
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 3775 - The Psychology of Religion: An Empirical Approach

    • This course focuses on the study of the influence of religion and spirituality on human behavior. Empirical findings are presented and discussed that allow for the critical evaluation of the role of religion and spirituality in understanding human motivation, cognition, behavior, and individual differences in personality. Students will examine findings on contemporary psychobiological thinking and religion; varieties of religious experience; religion/spirituality in childhood; and the role of religion in morality, psychopathology, and coping.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 2201; a research methods course in any discipline
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4000 - International Psychology

    • This course examines mainstream as well as alternative theoretical, methodological, and applied approaches that are relevant to the study and practice of international psychology. The topics discussed emphasize psychology's relevance to the understanding and solution of global problems, as well as how psychology itself is affected by events and cultures around the world.

    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4130 - Psychology of Aging

    • This course provides both a general introduction to the multi-disciplinary field of gerontology and a specific emphasis on those aspects of aging behavior that are of particular interest to psychologists, namely, learning and memory, intellectual behaviors, attitudes, personality, psychopathology, perception, and clinical intervention. The primary purpose of the course is to provide a theoretical and empirical basis for understanding the aging process. Aging from a multicultural perspective is considered.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4345 - Learning and Behavior

    • This course offers an introduction to the various learning mechanisms that influence the establishment, maintenance, and/or reduction of behaviors in both humans and nonhuman animals. The course focuses on linking processes and theories of classical and operant conditioning to everyday behaviors.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 3301
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • PSYC 4400 - Directed Study in Psychology

    • This course is offered to students interested in investigating special topics and seminars external to regular course offerings. May include original research projects. A maximum of 6 hours of PSYC 4400 may be used towards satisfying the upper division major requirements. A maximum of 9 hours of PSYC 4400 is permitted overall.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300 , approval of instructor and department chair.
    • Credits: 1-3 Credit Hours
  • PSYC 4410 - Physiological Psychology

    • This course addresses the relationship between our underlying physiological systems and behavior. The topics investigated include neural communication, the anatomy of the nervous system, and the biological bases of sleep, reproductive behavior, stress, learning and memory, and mental disorders.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • PSYC 4415 - Perception

    • The subject matter of the course includes the physical properties of stimuli, the psychological methods of investigating perception, the anatomy and physiology of the sense organs, the central processing of stimuli, and demonstrations or laboratory investigations of sensory phenomena.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 2300
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • PSYC 4420 - Ethics and Professional Issues in Applied Psychology

    • A critical analysis of professional issues and the ethical standards in the practice of psychology. Traditional and emerging practice areas will be discussed. Topics such as licensure, prescription drug privileges, managed care, and treatment efficacy research will be explored. Ethical standards and decision-making will be studied in the context of professional practice.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4430 - Abnormal Psychology

    • This course provides an overview of the major categories of mental disorders, including current research on their classification, features, etiology, course, and treatment. Students also examine diagnostic processes and ethics as related to research and treatment with clinical populations.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4440 - Clinical and Counseling Psychology: Science and Practice

    • The course provides an introduction to the science and practice of clinical and counseling psychology from integrated perspectives. History, major theories, and scientific underpinnings are covered, as well as current developments in practice and research. Major topics include research design, theoretical models, diagnostic and assessment methods, psychotherapeutic interventions, treatment effectiveness, specialization, and training. The course may emphasize clinical or counseling psychology at the discretion of the instructor.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4445 - History and Systems of Psychology

    • This capstone course is designed to complete the major by integrating the student’s prior academic experiences in psychology. The historical development of psychology is examined, focusing on antecedents in philosophy and physiology, major early systems, major historical figures, and the historical/cultural context in which the field developed. A seminar format is used throughout the course to encourage student participation and interaction with peers and with faculty.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 3301 and one course from each of the five psychology curriculum areas (any one of the five psychology curriculum areas can be completed concurrently with PSYC 4445).
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4455 - Cognitive Psychology

    • An examination of the experimental investigation of complex cognitive processes, including the storage and retrieval of information, concept formation, reasoning, problem-solving and decision making.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 3301
    • Credits: 4-0-4
  • PSYC 4460 - Child Psychopathology

    • This course is an advanced level course focusing on the etiology, classification, assessment, and treatment of a select group of child and adolescent psychological disorders that are most frequently encountered by professionals in mental health and educational settings. The primary task of the child clinician is to identify and treat those children who suffer from emotional and/or behavioral problems that significantly interfere with their development and functioning.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 and one other developmental psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4475 - Psychology of Workplace Motivation and Leadership

    • This course examines topics of motivation and leadership in the workplace by addressing theoretical formulations, major research findings and real-world applications. Issues related to these topics will include gender, corporate culture, job attitudes, cross-cultural influences and organizational reward systems.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4490 - Special Topics in Psychology

    • This course will address selected topics of special interest to faculty and students.
    • Prerequisites: One 3000-level psychology course
    • Credits: 3-0-3
  • PSYC 4498 - Capstone Internship in Psychology

    • The Capstone Internship in Psychology course is a structured off-campus experience in a supervised setting that is chosen in relation to the student's major and interests. Practical experience is combined with a research approach that investigates issues relevant to the internship. Students meet with the internship coordinator to develop an appropriate plan that will lead to writing and presenting a research-oriented paper that integrates prior academic experiences in psychology, a requirement of the capstone experience.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 3301, one course from each of the five psychology curriculum areas (any one of the five psychology curriculum areas can be completed concurrently with PSYC 4498), and permission of the instructor (via departmental application).
    • Credits: 3-6 Credit Hours
  • PSYC 4499 - Senior Seminar in Psychology

    • A capstone course designed to complete the major by integrating the student's prior academic experiences in psychology. Contemporary issues, problems, research, and theories from the different areas identified in the psychology curriculum will be examined. Discussion will focus on both substantive and methodological concerns, as well as interconnections among areas of study. A seminar format will be used throughout the course to encourage student participation and interaction with peers and with faculty.
    • Prerequisites: PSYC 3301 and one course from each of the five psychology curriculum areas (any one of the five psychology curriculum areas can be completed concurrently with PSYC 4499).
    • Credits: 3-0-3