Department of Psychology

Tracie Stewart

Associate Professor of Psychology

Contact Information

Office: Kennesaw Campus
Social Sciences Building (SO 402), Room 5005B
Email: tstewa44@kennesaw.edu
Phone: 470-578-6244


Profile

 

Dr. Tracie Stewart earned her PhD in Social Psychology from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. She joined the Kennesaw State University Psychology Department as an Associate Professor in Fall 2013. Her primary research areas are stereotyping and prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup relations. Dr. Stewart's research collaborations with undergraduate students have culminated in over a dozen student co-authored journal articles and over 30 student co-authored conference presentations. In addition, her students have earned numerous awards for their research at regional and national conferences. In 2010, she received the Award for Outstanding Teaching and Mentoring from APA Division 9: The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. Dr. Stewart's emphasis on maintaining bridges between basic and applied research on social issues is reflected in her collaboration with the Social Security Administration (SSA) on their Diversity and Inclusion Training Initiative. In 2013, she developed and presented a video segment on Unconscious Bias to be shown to the SSA's 65,000 employees. She has also been a consultant on diversity training for BBC affiliates and appeared in the BBC4 documentary The Business of Race. Dr. Stewart's intergroup relations research has been published in journals such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Journal of Social Issues, and Psychological Science. Two of her articles on pedagogical strategies for teaching multicultural psychology courses were published in the journal Teaching of Psychology. Her work has been funded by a Russell Sage Foundation Cultural Contact Award and a Wayne F. Placek Award. She is presently on the editorial board of Basic and Applied Social Psychology and recently completed a three-year term as an Associate Editor for the British Journal of Social Psychology. She is looking forward to collaborating with KSU students who share her interest in studying the causes, consequences, and reduction of stereotyping and prejudice.

Courses Taught:
Social Psychology
Experimental Design and Analysis
Psychology of Gender
Psychology of Prejudice and Privilege


 


Courses that Dr. Stewart teaches at Kennesaw State University include:

Social Psychology
Experimental Psychology
Psychology of Gender
Psychology of Prejudice and Privilege

A few of Dr. Stewart's representative publications and presentations are listed below, with student co-authors' names in bold and italics:


Publications:

Stewart, T. L., Latu, I. M., Branscombe, N. R., Phillips, N. R., & Denney, H. T.  (2012).  Changing intergroup attitudes:  Effects of efficacy beliefs and awareness of white privilege.  Journal of Social Issues, 68, 11-27.

Latu, I. M., Stewart, T. L., Myers, A. C., Lisco, C., Estes, S. B., & Donohue, D.  (2011).
What we "say" and what we "think" about female managers: Explicit versus implicit associations of women with success.  Psychology of Women Quarterly, 35, 252-266.

Stewart, T. L., Latu, I. M., Branscombe, N. R., & Denney, H. T.  (2010).  Yes we can!  Prejudice reduction through seeing (inequality) and believing (in social change). Psychological Science, 21, 1557-1562.

Stewart, T. L., Latu, I. M., Kawakami, K., & Myers, A. C. (2010).  Consider the situation: Reducing automatic stereotyping through situational attribution training.  Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 221-225.

Stewart, T. L., Myers, A. C., & Culley, M. R. (2010).  Enhanced learning and retention through "writing to learn" in the psychology classroom.  Teaching of Psychology, 37, 46-49.

Smith, V. J., Stewart, T. L., Myers, A. C., & Latu, I. M.  (2008). Implicit coping responses to racism predict African Americans' level of psychological distress.  Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 30, 264-277.

Stewart, T. L., Jaspers, K. E., Estes, S. B., & Latu, I. M.  (2007).  Interethnic differences (or similarities?) in the relative individuation of women and men.  Sex Roles, 57, 21-29.

Stewart, T. L., van Knippenberg, A., Joly, J., Lippmann, M., Hermsen, B. J., & Harris, K. R.  (2004).  The influence of attitudes toward women on the relative individuation of women and men in the Netherlands.  Psychology of Women Quarterly, 28, 240-245.

Stewart, T. L., Berkvens, M., Engels, W. A. E. W., & Pass, J. A.  (2003).  Status and likability:  Can the "mindful" woman have it all?  Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33, 2040-2059.

 

Presentations:

Florez, I. A., Walsh, S. P., Bowden, M. M., Stewart, T. L., & Schulenberg, S. E. (2013, August). Examining meaning in life as a predictor of automatic stereotyping. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.

Stewart, T. L., Walsh, S. P., & Latu, I. M. (2013, August). Situational attribution training: Translating attribution theory into bias reduction practices. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, Honolulu, HI.

Robinson, A., Williams, C. C., & Stewart, T. L. (2012, November). Own-race bias and eye movements: Does effort predict memory? Poster presented at the annual meeting of Object Perception, Attention, and Memory, Minneapolis, MN.

Stewart, T. L. (2012, June). A mindful approach to teaching social issues. Invited paper presented in the symposium "Teaching and Mentoring Social Issues: SPSSI Award Winners Share Innovative Pedagogies" (K. Case, Chair) at the biennial meeting of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Charlotte, NC.

Culver, A. A., Stewart, T. L., Latu, I. M., Myers, A. C., & Walsh, S. P. (2012, January). Reducing automatic racial stereotyping via situational attribution training: Mechanisms and generalizability. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

Stewart, T. L., Glisson, S. M., Branscombe, N. R., & Latu, I. M. (2011, October). Empowering reconciliation: Efficacy to reduce inequality promotes improved intergroup relations. Paper presented in the symposium "Intergroup Reconciliation and Forgiveness" (N. Branscombe, Chair) at the annual meeting of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Washington D.C.